"I COULD NOT SEE THE SUN FOR MORE THAN TWO YEARS" – A LITTLE BOY IN PRISON/SOLITARY TOLD" WISH THAT NO CHILD HAS TO LIVE IN SHADOW! Photo pebbles foto – Bing images

Archive for March, 2019

New Museum for Children who fled Nazis


 

 

Helga Bellanger (nee Kohn) left Vienna when she was nine years old. Before she left she remembers her mother being made to “scrub the pavement in her fur coat”. Her mother survived the war but her uncle was killed in a concentration camp. She took a copy of the children’s book Heidi with her, as well as family photos.
Photo: Rosie Potter

https://www.thelocal.at/galleries/culture/poignant-memories-from-kindertransport-children/5

https://www.thelocal.at/galleries/culture/poignant-memories-from-kindertransport-children/4 or 3 …

 

 


Scientists and ethicists from around the world are warning of the consequences of failing to implement a temporary global halt on gene editing of human eggs, embryos, and sperm.


Scientists and ethicists from around the world are warning of the consequences of failing to implement a temporary global halt on gene editing of human eggs, embryos, and sperm. 

In a letter to the journal Nature, 18 scientists and ethicists from seven countries called for a global moratorium on the type of gene editing that can result in genetically altered babies. The letter was prompted by a 2018 announcement by a Chinese scientist declaring the birth of the world’s first gene-edited twin babies.

The 18 signatories of this call include scientists and ethicists who are citizens of 7 countries. Many of us have been involved in the gene-editing field by developing and applying the technology, organizing and speaking at international summits, serving on national advisory committees and studying the ethical issues raised.”

Fears of “designer babies” have been on the rise in the last decade as scientists move closer to producing embryos which have been genetically modified to produce children with specific, desirable characteristics. This vision was once the exclusive domain of Hollywood movies like Gattaca, but now, a future where parents are able to pick and choose exactly how their child’s genes express themselves is eerily close.

Specifically, the group is calling for a moratorium on germline cells—in this case egg or sperm cells—that can then be inherited and “could have permanent and possibly harmful effects on the species.”

To begin with, there should be a fixed period during which no clinical uses of germline editing whatsoever are allowed,” the scientists write. “As well as allowing for discussions about the technical, scientific, medical, societal, ethical and moral issues that must be considered before germline editing is permitted, this period would provide time to establish an international framework.”

From that point on, individual nations will choose their own paths. The scientists predict that some nations may choose to continue a moratorium indefinitely or a permanent ban. They also call on any nation that chooses to allow specific applications of germline editing to first give public notice and engage in an “international consideration about the wisdom of doing so.” The group also calls for a “transparent evaluation” to determine if germline editing is justified and for a nation to gain a “broad societal consensus” over the appropriateness of the editing.

No clinical application of germline editing should be considered unless its long-term biological consequences are sufficiently understood—both for individuals and for the human species,” the group urges.

In a separate letter to the journal Nature, Dr. Francis Collins, director of the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), stated that the NIH strongly agrees that a moratorium should begin immediately and last until nations commit to international rules to determine “whether and under what conditions such research should ever proceed.”

This is a crucial moment in the history of science: a new technology offers the potential to rewrite the script of human life. We think that human gene editing for reproductive purposes carries very serious consequences—social, ethical, philosophical and theological,” Collins wrote. “Such great consequences deserve deep reflection. A substantive debate about benefits and risks that provides opportunities for multiple segments of the world’s diverse population to take part has not yet happened. Societies, after those deeper discussions, might decide this is a line that should not be crossed. It would be unwise and unethical for the scientific community to foreclose that possibility.”

In a response to both letters, the editors of Nature released an editorial describing their viewpoint. “Whether or not a moratorium receives more widespread support, several things need to be done to ensure that germline gene-editing studies, done for the purposes of research only, are on a safe and sensible path,” the editors wrote. The editors called for all proposals and basic research studies using gene-editing tools in human embryos to be deposited in an open registry. Certain countries will have lax laws which could be exploited by “would-be mavericks” and thus there is a need for global laws to prevent and penalize unacceptable research, the editors state.

The right decisions on human germline modification can be reached only through frank and open discussion, followed by swift action. With so much at stake, that must happen now.”

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Featured image is from The Mind Unleashed


ABORTION OF BABIES – READY AND ABLE FOR LIFE – JONATHAN CAHN CALLS IT OUT: “NEW YORK´S GRUESOME LAW OF BAAL”



BOOKS OF THE BIBLE — MY FAITH-BLOG



Disabled Victims Are Syrian War’s Most Vulnerable


Disabled Victims Are Syrian War’s Most Vulnerable


FILE - Boys, one of them in a wheelchair, venture down a street in the al-Sheikh Said neighborhood of Aleppo, Syria, Sept. 1, 2016.
FILE – Boys, one of them in a wheelchair, venture down a street in the al-Sheikh Said neighborhood of Aleppo, Syria, Sept. 1, 2016.

Sham al-Akhras, 10, has only known war since the Syrian civil war started in March 2011, when she was an infant. If the brutal conflict is physically and emotionally distressing for regular Syrians, it is all the more so for al-Akhras, who has to live with her disability under the harsh conditions of a refugee camp in northern Syria’s Idlib.

Al-Akhras is unable to speak and can barely walk. Her father, Maher, told VOA that lack of access to medical facilities in Idlib’s war zone has prevented him from even diagnosing her condition, let alone getting proper treatment.

But despite the great barriers, al-Akhras has turned into a strong little girl, determined to fully live her childhood moments of carefree play and uncontrollable giggles.

“She is an independent and a brave little soul,” Maher said. “Sham does not allow us to help her in her daily life, like helping her stand up, put on her clothes or eat. She likes to do things by herself.”

Al-Akhras and her parents were displaced from Aleppo when the war escalated between the Syrian regime and rebels in 2012. They are settled in a refugee camp in Harem town near the Turkish border, where al-Akhras is enrolled in the first grade at the camp school.

Despite a lack of special accommodations for her at the school building, she insists on going there to learn the Arabic alphabet and work on coloring, shapes and other educational activities.

“The displacement was harsh on Sham. We left Aleppo because of the violence that took over our city. We lost our house in an airstrike by the regime. We are facing financial hardships; and adding to all this is the absence of professional medical aid and treatment because of the war that has made it harder for us to find good care for our daughter,” al-Akhras’ father said.

With no real end in sight to the war in Syria, al-Akhras is only one among thousands of disabled Syrians who have to carry the heavy burden of the conflict, according to rights organizations and experts following the plight of disabled Syrians.

Maya Merhi stands in the middle as her friends surround her in the Internally Displaced Persons camp of Serjilla in northwestern Syria next to Bab al-Hawa border crossing with Turkey, on Dec. 9, 2018. Eight-year-old Maya,was born without legs.
Maya Merhi stands in the middle as her friends surround her in the Internally Displaced Persons camp of Serjilla in northwestern Syria next to Bab al-Hawa border crossing with Turkey, on Dec. 9, 2018. Eight-year-old Maya,was born without legs.

Stigma and exclusion

Fayez Orabi, a Syrian doctor operating from Turkey, told VOA that many disabled Syrians also are suffering from stigma and exclusion within their communities, in addition to the effects of the war. He said neglect and lack of psychological help most likely would leave permanent psychological scars, especially on those who became impaired by the war.

“People who were disabled by the war suddenly find themselves unable to interact with their communities and can’t earn a living for their families. This adds a sense of guilt and shame in them because they have lost their abilities to be active like they used to be,” Orabi said.

Orabi said that disabled Syrians, facing an overwhelmingly unfavorable attitude, have almost no chance of getting into the work force to become productive members in their communities and breadwinners for their families.

“When a family member is disabled, especially when this person is the main provider to the family, the entire family is affected. Providing people with disabilities with an opportunity to be productive will support the entire family,” Orabi said.

In this Oct. 7, 2018, photo, a Syrian soldier who lost his legs while fighting in Syria's war, helps his comrade after a physical therapy session, at the Ahmad Hamish Martyr hospital in Damascus, Syria.
In this Oct. 7, 2018, photo, a Syrian soldier who lost his legs while fighting in Syria’s war, helps his comrade after a physical therapy session, at the Ahmad Hamish Martyr hospital in Damascus, Syria.

Millions displaced

According to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, the British-based war monitor, the Syrian civil war has cost the country about 560,000 lives with millions of people displaced.

The United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) said Monday that about 1.5 million people in Syria are now living with permanent impairments because of the conflict, including 86,000 people who have lost limbs. It estimated 3.3 million Syrian children are exposed to risks from explosive hazards such as land mines.

The agency said children with disabilities were particularly exposed to the devastation of war, and it asked aid organizations to help provide access to aids like wheelchairs, canes and prosthetics.

“In conflict, children with disabilities are among the most vulnerable,” said Geert Cappelaere, UNICEF’s Middle East and North Africa regional director. “They often require specialized treatment and services. As children, their needs differ from those of adults. Without access to services, schools and assistive products like wheelchairs, many children with disabilities face a very real risk of exclusion, neglect and stigmatization as the unrelenting conflict continues.”

Local activists in many areas have introduced initiatives to support people with disabilities by providing them with medical treatment and reintegrating them into the society. They say international aid is helpful but not enough — and a change of attitude is needed in the society to address the problem.

Hassan Hamzeh, an activist working for the rights of persons with disabilities in Idlib, said effective assistance should ensure that disabled Syrians are empowered to serve as active citizens without feeling shame because of their conditions.

Hamzeh worked with other local activists to start a school for children with disabilities in Idlib, though he notes their initiative has remained local and limited because of the lack of money and support.

“Helping people with disabilities to be self-sufficient and independent in life will pave the way for them to be active members in the Syrian society that needs every contribution to rebuild the country,” Hamzeh said.

VOA Extremism Watch Desk’s Sirwan Kajjo and VOA Turkish, Urdu and Kurdish services contributed to this report.

https://www.voanews.com/a/people-with-disabilities-are-most-vulnerable-as-syrian-conflict-enters-9th-year-/4833549.html

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pls. go to colouredjustice.wordpress.com for exact link: thank you! “WE NEED MORE TO DO FOR OUR BABIES!”



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UK “Witch” Who Cut the Genitals of Her Toddler Gets an 11-Year Prison Term — Brights – Die Natur des Zweifels PLUS “WÜSTENBLUME” YOU´LL SEE THE MARTYRIUM OF A LITTLE CHILD DONE BY AN UGLY WITCH


Via the Guardian comes a grisly tale of genital cutting and witchcraft in the heart of England. By Terry Firma | Friendly Atheist We previously wrote about the case here, right after the court’s guilty verdict. Now the judge, Justice Philippa Whipple, has imposed a jail sentence that matches the barbarity of the crime. A […]

via UK “Witch” Who Cut the Genitals of Her Toddler Gets an 11-Year Prison Term — Brights – Die Natur des Zweifels


White teacher held mock slave auction in fifth-grade classroom, put imaginary chains on black kids


colouredjustice.wordpress.com

pexels-photo-207691.jpeg

https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2019/3/12/1841464/-White-teacher-held-mock-slave-auction-in-fifth-grade-classroom-put-imaginary-chains-on-black-kids

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Former Abortionist Dr. Levatino at Virginia Tech



ENGLAND: JAGD AUF PÄDOPHILE | ARTE REPORTAGE – HUNTING PEDOPHILS